Two in five families are spending less on groceries as checkout prices soar, study finds

Two in five households have reduced food spending and some are skipping meals due to soaring prices, research shows.

Behavioral changes come as the price of basic foods such as milk, meat and fresh produce increases by more than 10% per year.

Some 37% – up 9 percentage points since March – have cut back on food spending, according to polling firm Opinium. And 43% say they plan to do so before winter.

One in five (19%) have taken the drastic decision to skip meals.

Some 37% – up 9 percentage points since March – have cut back on food spending, according to polling firm Opinium. And 43% say they plan to do so before winter

The British Retail Consortium trade association says general store inflation stands at 5.1%, the highest since it began collecting data in 2005. It estimated retail inflation price of food at 9.3% and that of fresh food at 10.5%. A four-pint carton of milk typically costs £1.45, an increase of around 25% since the start of this year

The British Retail Consortium trade association says general store inflation stands at 5.1%, the highest since it began collecting data in 2005. It estimated retail inflation price of food at 9.3% and that of fresh food at 10.5%. A four-pint carton of milk typically costs £1.45, up around 25% since the start of this year

Rocio Concha, director of policy at Consumer Champion Which?, said: “Soaring food prices will be concerning for households already struggling with a cost of living crisis in other regions.

“People are responding in different ways, including in the most desperate cases by missing meals or turning to food banks.”

At the same time, more than two-thirds of parents are worried about paying for food, energy and fuel and are being ‘overstretched’, the social good organization Nesta has found.

Parents say they feel “overwhelmed” and like they are “disappointed” and “failed” because they cannot afford to pay essential bills.

Ravi Gurumurthy, chief executive of Nesta, said: ‘Scarred by the last two years of Covid, school closures and closures, parents are now worried about the future and how they will feed their children, pay their bills energy and their mortgages and pay for child care. ‘

The British Retail Consortium trade association says general store inflation stands at 5.1%, the highest since it began collecting data in 2005. It estimated retail inflation price of food at 9.3% and that of fresh food at 10.5%. Helen Dickinson, its chief executive, said: “Increasing cost pressure in supply chains drove retail price inflation to a new high in August.

“The war in Ukraine and the subsequent rise in the prices of animal feed, fertilizers, wheat and vegetable oils have continued to drive up food prices.

“Fresh food inflation, in particular, reached its highest level since 2008 and products such as milk, margarine and crisps recorded the biggest increases.”

A four-pint carton of milk typically costs £1.45, up around 25% since the start of this year.

A 500g tub of Lurpak rose more than 17% to £4.21, a 500g pack of own-brand spaghetti rose 61% to 85p and a six-pack of Heinz Beanz cans jumped 36 % at £4.77. Miss Dickinson added: ‘Rising shop prices are playing into broader UK inflation, which some analysts say could top 18 per cent in 2023.

“The situation is grim for both consumers and retailers, but retailers will remain committed to supporting their customers by offering discounts to vulnerable groups, expanding value ranges, pricing essentials and increasing staff compensation.”

Mike Watkins of analyst NielsenIQ said: “Inflation continues to accelerate and shoppers are already cautious about how much they spend on groceries, with supermarket sales volumes falling in recent months. .”

“We can expect this level of food inflation to be with us for at least another six months.”

. families spending groceries checkout prices soar study finds

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