Artemis I gets a ‘go’ for Saturday’s launch as 400,000 spectators are expected to flood the Florida coast

More than 400,000 people got to see history in the making as NASA announced Artemis I had “departed” for launch on Saturday, which is the agency’s second attempt after the first was canceled on Monday.

NASA proudly shared during a pre-launch briefing on Friday that end-state core and engine preparations are complete and weather conditions look 60% favorable for the launch window which opens at 2:17 p.m. ET, then at 80% before it closed two hours later.

Monday saw a last-minute scrub due to a “bad” sensor reading that disappointed the 200,000 onlookers around Kennedy Space Center who waited in the area before sunrise to view the launch.

Artemis mission manager Mike Sarafin said in a statement: “There’s no guarantee we’ll lift off on Saturday, but we’ll try.”

Scroll down for video

The Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion capsule sit on Launchpad 39B at Kennedy Space Center in Florida awaiting its second chance for a maiden flight

The Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion capsule are currently installed on Launchpad 39B at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, awaiting their second chance for a maiden voyage.

If the mission continues on Saturday, the Orion capsule attached to the top of the rocket will spend 37 days in space, orbiting the Moon about 60 miles away.

Live coverage of the epic launch of Artemis I begins at 5:45 a.m., which will begin with checks and procedures as the countdown continues.

Teams will adjust procedures to cool down the engines, also known as the start-up purge test, approximately 30 to 45 minutes earlier in the countdown during the liquid hydrogen fast fill phase for the main stage.

NASA proudly shared during a pre-launch briefing on Friday that end-state core and engine preparations are complete and weather conditions look 60% favorable for the launch window which opens at 2:17 p.m. ET, then at 80% before it closed two hours later.

NASA proudly shared during a pre-launch briefing on Friday that end-state core and engine preparations are complete and weather conditions look 60% favorable for the launch window which opens at 2:17 p.m. ET, then at 80% before it closed two hours later.

Around 400,000 people are expected to watch the launch from the Florida coast, 200,000 more than were present on Monday (pictured)

Around 400,000 people are expected to watch the launch from the Florida coast, 200,000 more than were present on Monday (pictured)

Around 400,000 people are expected to watch the launch from the Florida coast, 200,000 more than were present on Monday (pictured)

This will allow more time to cool the engines to suitable temperatures for launch.

The team is concerned about Engine 3, although the issue stems from a misread, and another is a crack in the mid-stage intertank foam that was spotted during Monday’s event. .

This deformation could break off and touch part of the solid rocket booster, but Sarafin assured the public that he and his team believe the chances of this happening are very low.

It’s “a marginal increase in risk,” Sarafin said, but “we’re clearly ready to fly.”

“We had a plan for the August 29 launch attempt. He used the sensors to help confirm proper thermal conditioning of the motors. We had formed this plan, and then we ran into other problems,” he continued.

“We were out of the script in terms of a normal refueling operation, and the team did a fantastic job handling a dangerous condition. One of the worst things you can do when you find yourself in a dangerous situation is to deviate even further from the script.

The Orion capsule (pictured inside) will be disassembled when it flies into space. This mission is to ensure the safety of the technology before allowing humans to launch inside

The Orion capsule (pictured inside) will be disassembled when it flies into space. This mission is to ensure the safety of the technology before allowing humans to launch inside

The Orion capsule (pictured inside) will be disassembled when it flies into space. This mission is to ensure the safety of the technology before allowing humans to launch inside

If the mission continues on Saturday, the Orion capsule attached to the top of the rocket will spend 37 days in space, orbiting the Moon about 60 miles away

If the mission continues on Saturday, the Orion capsule attached to the top of the rocket will spend 37 days in space, orbiting the Moon about 60 miles away

If the mission continues on Saturday, the Orion capsule attached to the top of the rocket will spend 37 days in space, orbiting the Moon about 60 miles away

Saturday’s plan is to ignore the readings from the bad sensor and continue with the mission.

SLS chief engineer John Blevins said late Thursday that the rocket’s automated launch sequencer checks temperature, pressure and other parameters.

And because the faulty sensor is not part of the sequencer, it is not considered a flight instrument, Blevins explained.

If all goes according to plan after launch, another flight should follow in 2024 – this time with astronauts on board – before human boots return to the lunar surface again a year later under the ambitious program. NASA’s $93 billion Artemis.

It’s been half a century since people walked on the moon in December 1972 – more than half the world’s population having never seen a moon landing.

If for some reason NASA misses the Saturday launch window, the latest save date is September 5.

The Orion capsule is uncrewed, but it does contain three test dummies designed to test how humans behave in the rocket, in space and when splashing down in the Pacific in October.

The trip will take about a week and Orion will approach 60 miles from the lunar surface before firing its thrusters to orbit up to 40,000 miles.

This will break Apollo 13’s record for the furthest distance a spacecraft designed for humans has flown from Earth.

And the capsule’s return trip to Earth will last from the 35th to the 42nd day of the mission, before splashdown occurs on the 43rd day.

Artemis I is designed to show that the SLS rocket and Orion capsule are ready to carry astronauts for Artemis II, and ultimately the Artemis III mission to return humans to the moon.

NASA will land the first woman and first person of color on the moon in 2025 as part of the Artemis mission

Artemis was Apollo’s twin sister and moon goddess in Greek mythology.

NASA has chosen her to personify its path back to the moon, which will see astronauts return to the lunar surface by 2025 – including the first woman and the next man.

Artemis 1, formerly Exploration Mission-1, is the first in a series of increasingly complex missions that will enable human exploration of the Moon and Mars.

Artemis 1 will be the first integrated flight test of NASA’s deep space exploration system: the Orion spacecraft, the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, and ground systems at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida.

Artemis 1 will be an uncrewed flight that will provide a foundation for human exploration of deep space and demonstrate our commitment and ability to extend human existence to the moon and beyond.

During this flight, the spacecraft will launch on the most powerful rocket in the world and fly farther than any spacecraft built for humans has ever flown.

It will travel 280,000 miles (450,600 km) from Earth, thousands of miles beyond the Moon during a mission lasting approximately three weeks.

Artemis 1, formerly Exploration Mission-1, is the first in a series of increasingly complex missions that will enable human exploration of the Moon and Mars. This graphic explains the different stages of the mission

Artemis 1, formerly Exploration Mission-1, is the first in a series of increasingly complex missions that will enable human exploration of the Moon and Mars. This graphic explains the different stages of the mission

Artemis 1, formerly Exploration Mission-1, is the first in a series of increasingly complex missions that will enable human exploration of the Moon and Mars. This graphic explains the different stages of the mission

Orion will stay in space longer than any astronaut ship without docking with a space station and will return home faster and warmer than ever.

With this first exploration mission, NASA is leading the next steps in human deep space exploration where astronauts will build and begin testing the near-moon systems needed for lunar surface missions and outward exploration. other destinations farther from Earth, including Mars.

They will take the crew on a different trajectory and test Orion’s critical systems with humans on board.

Together, Orion, SLS and Kennedy’s ground systems will be able to meet the most challenging requirements of deep space crew and cargo missions.

Eventually, NASA is looking to establish a sustainable human presence on the moon by 2028 as a result of the Artemis mission.

The space agency hopes this colony will discover new scientific discoveries, demonstrate new technological advances, and lay the groundwork for private companies to build a lunar economy.

. Artemis gets for launch saturday so spectators should flood coast florida

. Artemis Saturdays launch spectators expected flood Florida coast

PREV 11-bit studios will no longer give keys to Steam curators
NEXT Watch Russian spacewalkers test a European robotic arm on Friday